Reading.docx


First answer in 300 words or more:

The mother-daughter narrative and conflict are often played out in Asian American women’s literature. However, Cathy Park Hong challenges this trope in the chapter “Education.” What does she do instead? What conflict does she present (between what characters)? How does this influence the genre/canon of Asian/Pacific Islander literature?

Second respond 200 words or more:

From last week’s readings and class discussions, we talked about how the mother daughter relationship in Asian American families can be dynamic and intrusive in a sense where the mother always feels the need to protect her daughter and be aware of what’s going on In her life, regardless of how she gets the information or how she makes her daughter feel. We also highlighted how the relationship is full of unconditional dutiful love. I think my own experience, being an Asian daughter to both my Asian father and mother, has taught me that family is regardless, forgiving, and forever accepting, no matter how sad, mad, angry, or frustrated one might feel or felt. A significant part of my family dynamic, that always confused, me was how quick we can go from yelling and being angry at each other, to talking about weekend plans or what we want for dinner in a tone that completely dismisses the disagreement we had seconds before. This experience, growing up, has taught me to be patient, forgiving, and to always stand by my family’s side no matter how our relationship might be at that time.  In Cathy Hong’s chapter “Education”, I believe this parallel is played out in her rollercoaster friendship with Erin and particularly with Helen. Throughout the chapter, she expressed how they both, like many Asian parents, made her feel a mix of emotions that ranged from feeling uncomfortable, to open, and even unbearable at times. Despite the drama that surrounded their relationship, like publicizing each others life experience with partial consent, to stealing each others work (which was a big deal), they still continued to stay in each others lives, even become roommates, and then eventually never seeing each other again. When she reflected on her relationship with Helen, Hong expressed how she did not miss her, but part of her longed for the essence of Helen that made her the writer she is today. I believe the reflection at the end of her essay is similar to how other people may feel towards their sometimes overbearing but unconditional loving mothers.

Reading.docx


First answer in 300 words or more:

The mother-daughter narrative and conflict are often played out in Asian American women’s literature. However, Cathy Park Hong challenges this trope in the chapter “Education.” What does she do instead? What conflict does she present (between what characters)? How does this influence the genre/canon of Asian/Pacific Islander literature?

Second respond 200 words or more:

From last week’s readings and class discussions, we talked about how the mother daughter relationship in Asian American families can be dynamic and intrusive in a sense where the mother always feels the need to protect her daughter and be aware of what’s going on In her life, regardless of how she gets the information or how she makes her daughter feel. We also highlighted how the relationship is full of unconditional dutiful love. I think my own experience, being an Asian daughter to both my Asian father and mother, has taught me that family is regardless, forgiving, and forever accepting, no matter how sad, mad, angry, or frustrated one might feel or felt. A significant part of my family dynamic, that always confused, me was how quick we can go from yelling and being angry at each other, to talking about weekend plans or what we want for dinner in a tone that completely dismisses the disagreement we had seconds before. This experience, growing up, has taught me to be patient, forgiving, and to always stand by my family’s side no matter how our relationship might be at that time.  In Cathy Hong’s chapter “Education”, I believe this parallel is played out in her rollercoaster friendship with Erin and particularly with Helen. Throughout the chapter, she expressed how they both, like many Asian parents, made her feel a mix of emotions that ranged from feeling uncomfortable, to open, and even unbearable at times. Despite the drama that surrounded their relationship, like publicizing each others life experience with partial consent, to stealing each others work (which was a big deal), they still continued to stay in each others lives, even become roommates, and then eventually never seeing each other again. When she reflected on her relationship with Helen, Hong expressed how she did not miss her, but part of her longed for the essence of Helen that made her the writer she is today. I believe the reflection at the end of her essay is similar to how other people may feel towards their sometimes overbearing but unconditional loving mothers.

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