First, let me begin by stating that I am a “HUGE” Marvel Fan (so please bear with me :). In the Feige, Russo, and Russo (2014) film Captain America: The Winter Soldier, the villains attempt to enact “


First, let me begin by stating that I am a “HUGE” Marvel Fan (so please bear with me :).

In the Feige, Russo, and Russo (2014) film Captain America: The Winter Soldier, the villains attempt to enact “Project Insight,” wherein three heli-carriers linked to satellites equipped with a data-mining algorithm preemptively eliminate people viewed as threats. While this normalization of constant surveillance and retributive justice is critiqued in superhero movies like Captain America, it is rarely critiqued as a policing practice. Across the globe, investment in predictive policing technology is growing. As of early 2019, there are 50 police departments across the United States and 14 departments in the United Kingdom using predictive policing technology. Alongside this, China is building its own “police cloud,” which, according to the Human Rights Watch, is designed to “predict the activities of activists, dissidents, and ethnic minorities” (HRW, 2017, para. 1). This normalization of predictive policing means critiques are rarely raised within police departments, but in early March of 2019, Inspector General Mark Smith’s 52-page review of Los Angeles’s big-data technology critiqued the system, claiming it employed “inconsistent criteria” (Puente, 2019).

From your reading(s) The Rise of Big Data Policing – Please respond to the following two question(s):

First, what is data-driven policing, and why do police departments like it so much? Second, whom, where, when, and how do we police, and how does big data policing change this?

The minimum word count is 450 words, if you need to write more than the minimum to completely express your thoughts that is acceptable as well.

Files:
Criminal_Record_Questions_in_the_Era_of.pdf, Henry-Jacobs.BantheBox.article.Oct-07.pdf
First, let me begin by stating that I am a “HUGE” Marvel Fan (so please bear with me :). In the Feige, Russo, and Russo (2014) film Captain America: The Winter Soldier, the villains attempt to enact “


First, let me begin by stating that I am a “HUGE” Marvel Fan (so please bear with me :).

In the Feige, Russo, and Russo (2014) film Captain America: The Winter Soldier, the villains attempt to enact “Project Insight,” wherein three heli-carriers linked to satellites equipped with a data-mining algorithm preemptively eliminate people viewed as threats. While this normalization of constant surveillance and retributive justice is critiqued in superhero movies like Captain America, it is rarely critiqued as a policing practice. Across the globe, investment in predictive policing technology is growing. As of early 2019, there are 50 police departments across the United States and 14 departments in the United Kingdom using predictive policing technology. Alongside this, China is building its own “police cloud,” which, according to the Human Rights Watch, is designed to “predict the activities of activists, dissidents, and ethnic minorities” (HRW, 2017, para. 1). This normalization of predictive policing means critiques are rarely raised within police departments, but in early March of 2019, Inspector General Mark Smith’s 52-page review of Los Angeles’s big-data technology critiqued the system, claiming it employed “inconsistent criteria” (Puente, 2019).

From your reading(s) The Rise of Big Data Policing – Please respond to the following two question(s):

First, what is data-driven policing, and why do police departments like it so much? Second, whom, where, when, and how do we police, and how does big data policing change this?

The minimum word count is 450 words, if you need to write more than the minimum to completely express your thoughts that is acceptable as well.

Files:
Criminal_Record_Questions_in_the_Era_of.pdf, Henry-Jacobs.BantheBox.article.Oct-07.pdf

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